Project delivery of PSRC funds

As part of its overall effort to ensure projects receiving PSRC funds move forward efficiently, PSRC has implemented a successful project tracking program, which helps project sponsors meet any requirement hurdles in a timely fashion.

King County Metro's trolley buses were part of PSRC's project delivery target this year.

King County Metro’s trolley buses were part of PSRC’s project delivery target this year.

At its December 8 meeting, the Transportation Policy Board will be reviewing some recent research into the tracking program to see if there are any potential risks imposed on projects when funds are awarded only to the preliminary engineering / design phase, rather than complete funding through construction.

Also in funding news, the board is set to release a list of projects recommended for PSRC’s special needs transportation funding through the Coordinated Grant Program.

The board will also be reviewing the draft work program for the upcoming update to Transportation 2040, which is slated to be finalized in January.

See the full agenda here and watch it live on December 8 at 9:30 am.

 


Transportation Policy Board to recommend top projects for funding

On July 14 the Transportation Policy Board is expected to recommend projects that will receive a share of $700 million in federal funds coming to the region through 2020.

The South Lander Street grade separation project in Seattle would receive $9.6 million for preliminary engineering.

The South Lander Street grade separation project in Seattle would receive $9.6 million for preliminary engineering. (SDOT Photo)

The competition began earlier this year to select projects for several sources of funding from the Federal Highway Administration and the Federal Transit Administration.

In all, over 300 projects requesting more than $1 billion applied for funding.

Projects recommended for PSRC’s regional funding competition include:

  • Sound Transit – Light Rail Extension from Angle Lake Station to Kent/Des Moines – $13,000,000
  • Community Transit – Swift II BRT – $5,000,000
  • Snohomish County – Transportation Demand Management on Regional Corridors – $865,000
  • King County – Transportation Demand Management Corridor Strategies Supporting Centers – $4,184,900
  • Washington State Ferries Vessels – Reduce Diesel Fuels Program – $3,300,100
  • Sound Transit – Sounder Station Access Improvements – $6,700,000
  • Seattle – Center City Connector – $7,300,000
  • Seattle – South Lander Street Grade Separation – $9,594,692
  • Redmond – 152nd Avenue Main Street – $4,400,000
  • Kirkland – 124th Avenue NE Roadway Improvements – $1,378,508
  • Lynnwood – 42nd Avenue W Improvements – $1,297,500
  • Tacoma – Taylor Way Rehabilitation – $1,384,300
  • WSDOT – SR 167 northbound/SR 410 to SR 18 – Congestion Management – $5,015,000
  • Washington State Ferries & Bainbridge Island – Sound to Olympics Trail Extension & Bainbridge Ferry Terminal Pedestrian Bridge Replacement – $2,100,000
  • Snohomish County – Adaptive Signal Control System – Phase 2 – $1,730,000

Also on the policy board’s agenda:  discussion of the Sound Transit 3 conformity process and designation of the region’s critical urban freight corridors.

The meeting will be Thursday, July 14, 9:30 a.m. – 12 noon.  See the full agenda packet here.

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Transportation and growth boards have new vice chairs

Poulsbo Mayor Becky Erickson and Redmond Councilmember Hank Margeson have been named as the new vice chairs of PSRC’s transportation and growth management policy boards.

Poulsbo Mayor Becky Erickson and Redmond Councilmember Hank Margeson

Poulsbo Mayor Becky Erickson and Redmond Councilmember Hank Margeson

“Mayor Erickson brings a wealth of experience and commitment to the Transportation Policy Board. I look forward to working together with her to address our regional transportation challenges!” said Seattle Councilmember Rob Johnson, board chair.

Mayor Erickson was elected mayor of Poulsbo in 2010 after serving two years on the city council, and has an extensive background in business and finance. She represents local transit in Kitsap County on the policy board, and is a member of the Executive Board and Operations Committee.

Councilmember Hank Margeson was appointed vice chair of the Growth Management Policy Board.

“I’m delighted that Councilmember Margeson is taking on this leadership role,” said Tacoma Deputy Mayor Ryan Mello, who chairs the growth board.  “Hank understands the importance of planning for healthy communities in cities of all sizes and working collaboratively across the region to achieve a shared vision for directing growth and building equitable, vibrant and prosperous communities.”

Councilmember Margeson is now serving his third term on the Redmond City Council and has been an active PSRC board member since 2012. Professionally, he works as a senior compliance analyst at Liberty Mutual (Safeco) Insurance.  He’s also active in youth sports and serves as president of the Northwest Baseball Umpires Association board.

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State of the region’s transportation system in 2016

Condition of the region’s roads, bridges, and ferry and transit systems was the focus of a presentation to the Transportation Policy Board this week.

photo of workers replacing expansion joint on I-5

Workers replacing an expansion joint on I-5. (Photo credit – WSDOT)

One of the findings:  The Connecting Washington package provided much-needed funding to address state highway conditions, but didn’t address critical city and county needs.

Analysis shows that conditions vary across jurisdictions based on local funding limitations and opportunities. Going forward, more comprehensive and consistent data collection is necessary to better understand city pavement conditions.

Data shows that ferry conditions are holding steady, yet new funding will be needed to address long-term vessel replacement needs.

Fish-passage barrier removal has re-opened hundreds of miles of fish habitat and is well-funded into the near future.

Another major finding:  The region and state need to evaluate and prioritize I-5 preservation needs, focusing on pavement preservation and seismic retrofit.

About $2 billion is needed to rebuild I-5 through the region.

The Connecting Washington package takes a step in the right direction, providing $1.2 billion over the next 16 years for preservation of highways statewide and targeting I-5 as a priority.

But $435 million in seismic retrofit needs on I-5 through Seattle are not currently prioritized.

The briefing on the state of the system is one in a series of presentations to the board that will help set the stage for the next update of the regional transportation plan in 2018.

You can see the presentation here or watch the video (starting at about 34:31).

 


Rob Johnson to be new Transportation Board Chair

PSRC President John Marchione, Mayor of Redmond, has selected Seattle Councilmember Rob Johnson to be the new Chair of the Transportation Policy Board.

Seattle Councilmember Rob Johnson will be the new Chair of the Transportation Policy Board.

Seattle Councilmember Rob Johnson will be the new Chair of the Transportation Policy Board.

“Councilmember Johnson has been a tireless advocate for expanding transportation choices across Washington. He has worked to get additional resources to implement the region’s transportation plan and has been an active member of the Transportation Policy Board since 2009,” said Mayor Marchione.

Councilmember Johnson was elected to Seattle City Council in 2015. Prior to that, he spent 10 years working for Transportation Choices Coalition (a statewide nonprofit dedicated to expanding multi-modal transportation infrastructure), serving as Executive Director from 2008 to 2015. He served on PSRC’s Transportation Policy Board in that role.

Rob is a native Seattleite and earned his Master’s in Urban Planning at the University of California, Los Angeles.

He will Chair the Transportation Policy Board meeting on Thursday, March 10. See the full agenda here.

 

 

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PSRC funding in the spotlight

The next round of $700 million in PSRC funding will be decided on in 2016.

Doc Maynard, the new water taxi that debuted this week, was a recipient of PSRC funding. Since 2012, PSRC has provided a total of $1.3 million in federal funding to the King County Ferry District for vessel acquisition.

Doc Maynard, the new water taxi that debuted this week, was a recipient of PSRC funding. Since 2012, PSRC has provided a total of $1.3 million in federal funding to the King County Ferry District for vessel acquisition.

The Transportation Policy Board is set to recommend the policy direction for this funding at its meeting on January 14, 2016. The draft policy framework continues to focus on support for centers and corridors, strengthens criteria for equity and air quality, and asks for more information on innovation.

The board will also be recommending projects for two programs that had higher than expected funding amounts.

PSRC has an additional $7.7 million in FTA funds to distribute to the region’s transit agencies for projects they submit. These funds are part of an adjustment based on transit services provided to the region.

Skagit Transit, which provides commuter transit services to the Puget Sound region, has submitted a brand new project for this funding. PSRC is asking for public comment on a $325,843 funding recommendation for Skagit Transit’s Maintenance Operations and Administration Facility. The funding would be used for design and engineering services to remodel the newly acquired facility.

An additional $79,676 is also available to partially fund two special needs projects on the contingency list:  one King County Metro project and the Hyde Shuttle run by Senior Services of King County.

The meeting will also include a recommendation on Issaquah’s plan for its Regional Growth Center and an amendment to the SR 520 Bridge Replacement and HOV Project.

See the full Transportation Policy Board meeting agenda here, watch the meeting here next week.

 

 

 

 

 

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I-405 express tolling performance

The Transportation Policy Board is poised to hear an update on how the I-405 express toll lanes are performing.

WSDOT is monitoring congestion in the general purpose lanes to better understand the impacts of the express tolling option.

WSDOT is monitoring congestion in the general purpose lanes to better understand the impacts of the express tolling option.

The Washington State Department of Transportation reports that in the first eight weeks, south bound toll lane travelers saved about 14 minutes for an average cost of $2.35 and north bound travelers saved about 15 minutes for $2.20.

WSDOT is continuing to monitor and improve the performance of the system.

The board will also hear an update on long-range transit integration work syncing up around the region. All of the region’s transit agencies and ferry operators are currently engaging in long-range planning activities. This work is creating the foundation for an integrated regional transit network and vision to be developed through Transportation 2040.

See the full agenda here. Watch the meeting on Thursday morning here.

 

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